outside sewer pipe

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    • #279182
      ögö

      I have and older home and the sewer pipe outside is cast iron and rustedout with holes . you name it .. I need/want to change it to a pvc pipe, but unsure how to do it.. the pipe is very close to the surface of the yard . infact so close that you can actually see the pipe.. (thats how bad it is)the septic tank is in good condition as are all interior pipes. I do not have the money to pay hundreds of dollars to plumbers or contractors..

    • #300225
      Retired plbg1

      You will have to get it fixed because the surface water will be getting into your tank. Go to store and buy pipe and ask them how to install it, are go to http://www.google.com and ask them how to install pvc drain pipe.

    • #300226
      Robert Stephen Morton

      Mr Lyallmk, I’m only an Ausie but it seems to me that the reason Mr Lyallmk has cast iron in the first place is because of its depth & the strength of cast iron.

      In Australia we must have 12″ cover over any pipe that is not cast iron, otherwise any other material must be concrete encased.
      I am a fully licensed plumber, extremely proud of my chosen profession. I will help if I can, but will not bastardise the profession by giving unprofessional advice to lay people.

      We are talking about a HEALTH issue here with sewer products, it is not the domain of a lay person to be stuffing around with plumbing that may affect the health of other people. That is why licensing was & continues to be policed – for the protection of the public.

      Mr Lyallmk it is your responsibility as a land holder to keep the Plumbing & drainage in good repair. This does not necessarily mean for you to carry out the work yourself. it means that you are charged with the responsibility of making sure the work is carried out properly, you yourself said that you were unsure of how to do it.

      The expense of engaging a licensed plumber is an investment not a cost.
      Bob

      » This message has been edited by John Aldrich on 20 January 2003

    • #300227
      lyallmk

      Bob,
      Thank you for your advise. however I am the renter not the owner of the property, however the owner believes it is my responsibility to make all repairs on the home.

    • #300228
      Robert Stephen Morton

      Lyallmk. Move out & see who is responsible then.
      Bob

    • #300229
      nicktheplumber

      Well, Aussie is correct about the health & safety issues of septic plumbing. It’s a fact that the increased longevity and better health of modern civilized people is more due to plumbers than to doctors!

      That being said, if you are reasonably intelligent, can understand the rationale of the plumbing codes, and are reasonably handy and have the right tools and plmbing supplies, you COULD effect the repair yourself (with one more caveat…IF your local authority allows you to do the work). Even if that is the case, a permit and inspection will always be required. My juridiction allows homeowners to do many plumbing (and other) installations and repairs, BUT they also require an inspection to assure the work is up to code. Whether this leeway is given to renters, I’m not sure. Check with your landlord and your local authorities…

      In any case, sewer lines must be protected, usually by burying to a sufficient depth and providing an adequate stable base (such as sand and/or pea gravel. For relatively shallow waste pipes, cast-iron is needed to provide impact resistance. The joinery, slope, and layout must be exact.

      I would not automatically prohibit amateurs from doing their own plumbing, if they know what they are doing and follow the local codes.

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