new gas line

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    • #278300
      cperry

      Ok, a little help needed here. I’m going to be running a new LP gas line in my house to service a forced-air furnace and a LP fireplace (no currnet LP service). I’m planing on using flex stainless lines. I’ve never used this before and need some help. Should I run the main line from the LP tank to the utility room and into a manifold, then run two seprate lines from the manifold, one to the furnace and one to the fireplace? What size flex pipe should I use for the three runs? Can I run the flex stainless right out the side of the house for the LP tank connection? Any other tips/advice?

    • #298223
      nicktheplumber
      Participant

      I believe that corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) is allowed in interior installations only strictly in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications for the appliance. CSST is usually installed in short runs from the appliance gas valve to the appliance. I don’t think you can use it for longer runs of gas supply pipe: used approved pipe materials and fittings for that. Check with your local authorties.

      NtP

    • #298224
      Robert Stephen Morton
      Participant

      Do I read that question right? You are going to run the high pressure to the utility room & then install the manifold? Mate, if you have to ask questions on this forum about the technicalities of gas installation – then you are obviously “Not” Licensed”
      Wetthumbs, GAS KILLS – call a licensed person to carry out the installation, its real cheap insursance.
      Bob

    • #298225
      wetthumbs
      Participant

      Thanks for the reply Nick. I have been doing reserch on the CSST. I have not run across anything saying that its use is limited to short runs or that it is limited in interior applications. In fact I have read reccomendations on how to protect the tubing from nail/screw punctures when intalling this in walls. admittedly, these reccomendations came from the CSST’s manufacter. Also, I have no “local athorities” to contact. This is a very rural location, and yes, belive me when I say this, we are not zoned, their is no permit needed do such work, there are no inspectors, and their is no local plumber to contact to hire the work out to. I’m on my own on this one.

      Bob, sorry mate, I guess your right, I should not ask questions of people who don’t know the difference between a manifold and a regulator.

    • #298226
      wetthumbs
      Participant

      Here’s a link to learn more:
      null

    • #298227
      Robert Stephen Morton
      Participant

      Wetthumbs. I apologise for the misinterpretation – we use manifolds at the cylinder’s. we use “tees” with branches to the appliance.
      My comment about licensed persons is still appropriate.
      Bob

    • #298228
      mikeinpa
      Participant

      Wetthumbs, the tubing you are planning to use is used very much in my area .although you must have a certification to purchase and install the product ,required by most manufactures. Your research is very helpfull to your understanding of the product , yet sizing and installation guidelines are very important . Yes it is only to be used for interior installations .Contact one of the manufacturers for sizing and installation guidelines. Im sorry but I will not give you advice on installation or sizing,Gas kills as Bob said . Also you may want to check with your propane supplier for any set up requirements . Mike.

      » This message has been edited by mikeinpa on 01 September 2003

      » This message has been edited by mikeinpa on 01 September 2003

    • #298229
      nicktheplumber
      Participant

      CSST is approved by code, e.g IRC 2413.5, but as I said above, only for interior runs and only according to the manufacturer’s specs. These pipes require special cutting techniques, tools, and fittings to ensure good connections. So far as I know, you cannot run the lines for any distance outside or through the foundation/exterior walls. The UPC (2000) is silent about CSST, and seems to defer to local authorities. Some locales do not permit the use of CSST for anything except terminal hookups to appliances.

      While the IRC might permit CSST runs inside walls, I do not feel comfortable installing them that way (in fact I haven’t used CSST for long pipe runs). I am very conservative and cautious about gas. I’m sure CSST is good stuff, but I’m not so sure about the fittings, which are essentially flared connections. There is a reason why the codes otherwise prohibit unions and flared fittings in inaccessible locations. If the manufacturer’s did somehow convince the code writers to approve CSST connections in concealed locations, I’d still suggest that if you plan to use it, make all of the connections in the open.

      NtP

    • #298230
      Selgas
      Participant

      Hey you guys!!!!!!!

      Regardless of how far out in the boonies this chap lives there ia ALWAYS a tradesperson ready and willing to travel the distance and do the required work.
      I would never undertake giving a layman instructions on how to and what to look out for etc etc in running LPG gas lines top a residential property.
      Never mind the added risk of failing to “set up” the gas appliances connected to that pipework.
      Lets just cut to the quick – wetthumbs don’t muck about with the work – hire a Professional in the long run you will gain the benefits and sleep better knowing it is installed safely.
      Dang if you want to meet the costs I would be willing to do the job!!!!



      Selgas Services Ltd
      Craftsman Gasfitters, Plumbers, Electrical Service Technicians

    • #298231
      wetthumbs
      Participant

      Again, good advice guys. All lines and fittings will be accessible in my situation. I will not be running through interior walls.

      PS – A guy I know hired a professional to run a gas line for him. The tradsman traveled a HECK of a long way to do it. He ran the bright yellow claded CSST along the outside of the house just above the foundation. He ran it through a hole he bored through a brick firplace to service a gas log set. I will not be calling this person to run my lines. I feel better doing it myself.

    • #298232
      nicktheplumber
      Participant

      I have to defer to Peter on his warning about the installation. We agree that plumbing, especially gas plumbing, must be installed safely according to code. The only point on which we disagree is that I believe a competent and knowledgeable homeowner should be allowed to do his own job PROVIDED THAT HE HAS THE WORK SIGNED OFF BY THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR. No matter how far out in the Boonies you may be, there is a building inspector who can examine and pass or fail your job.

      NtP

    • #298233
      NOS Plumbing and Heating</titl
      Participant

      have a LP company put in the tank and run to the regualator on your house from there run Black Pipe with “pipe dope” not thread tape! run at least 3/4 to the first appliance (fire place or furnace), the tee off and run at least 1/2″ to the next.

      remember to put your drip pipe down before your appliance. after that you can run flex. use the least amount of flex as posible.



      NOS Plumbing and Heating
      Tristan Novak, Pres.

    • #298234
      NOS Plumbing and Heating</titl
      Participant

      “””” if your appliances arnt in a strait line with the pipe just tee off in the middle and run 1/2 both ways

      no gas water heater???
      if you have the gas there you should use it way more effic. than electric water heat!!



      NOS Plumbing and Heating
      Tristan Novak, Pres.

    • #298235
      wetthumbs
      Participant

      Thanks NOS! No, no gas h2o heater. That may change after the LP tank is delivered next week. Although the new one would need to be a power-vent. I also may add a heater kit and let my outdoor wood boiler heat my h2o for the winter.

      Just wondering why you say “no” to the CSST? Do you have expierence with it? I see the place where I work is using CSST for all new gas lines, including outdoor lines.

    • #298236
      NOS Plumbing and Heating</titl
      Participant

      its mainly that i like the looks of BP better it’s all square and professional looking, i use CSST for short runs but i don’t use any more than i need, i haven’t ever use just CSST. BP is strong you can it hit with a 5 lb hammer and you wont have ne leaks. CSST my be faster and maybe cheaper too but i think for the best looks and prof. quality BP is the way to go. But that’s just my opinion. but if you live in an area where there my be earthquakes you might be better of with csst



      NOS Plumbing and Heating
      Tristan Novak, Pres.

    • #298237
      wetthumbs
      Participant

      Thanks for any help from you guys. The new gas line is in. Flexable copper. Heating contractor ran it.

    • #298238
      Selgas
      Participant

      Great news and the beast way to get the job done safely as well as correctly – well done!



      Selgas Services Ltd
      Craftsman Gasfitters, Plumbers, Electrical Service Technicians

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