Copper line corrosion

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    • #277436
      MasterPlumbers
      Keymaster

      On my hot water line to the kitchen faucet the copper line has extenisve green colored corrosion covering the total line for a 2 foot length to an elbow which also displays the same effect. My water supply is well water with a water softner which operates satisfactorily. No leaks exists but what causes this corrosion and should the line be replaced?

    • #296225
      PLUMBILL
      Participant

      Heating your well water can create a chemical reaction causing the corrosion of the pipe. You could try and clean the pipe with some sandcloth first and inspect for damage, I would also consider changing the pipe and inspect the inside.

    • #296226
      nicktheplumber
      Participant

      Provided that you have no dielectric joint problems and your pipes aren’t leaking, this greenish (copper oxide) corrosion is usually caused by moisture condensing on the outside of the pipes. You could try polishing and drying these pipes and coating them with a polyurethane varnish.

    • #296227
      racefanone
      Participant

      Replace the pipe with a no burst supply.The line more than likely has some bad spots in it and if you mess around with it a leak will start. Do not waste your time and money on trying to coat it.

      » This message has been edited by racefanone on 25 November 2004

      » This message has been edited by John Aldrich on 26 November 2004

    • #296228
      AKPlumber
      Participant

      When you see a corroded line, you replace it. Period. In the time it takes to simply cut the bad portion of line out and sweating a new one in, it does’nt make sense to not do so.

      To the original poster, corrosion often is the product of electrolosis, which can be caused by hard water, copper lines either touching each other or touching another line that’s not copper (such as a gas line) or as has been mentioned, can be caused by the lack of dialectric use when joining copper lines to iron fittings. In many municipalities, the use of dialectrics on boilers is not required anymore, and you can just screw a male copper adapter right into an iron nipple on the return or supply side…..but I recommend against doing so. Corrosion also can result when the lines are just very old and have sludge build-up in them. Either way, Racefan is correct, if it’s the lines from the angle stop valves to the faucet itself, just replace it with flex steel supply lines long enough for your application. If you have copper supply lines elsewhere (before the angle stops, assuming you have any) with lots of corrosion apparent, CUT IT OUT and replace it with new type M copper.
      There are systems existing out there that use a solution injected under pressure through the entire copper line system that is supposed to stop and prevent further corrosion (usually used in buildings with numerous and frequent pinhole leaks) but this option is expensive and requires a licensed contractor. Simply replacing and sweating in new lines yourself is’nt hard and can be done by any competent handyman with a torch and a roll of solder/flux.

      » This message has been edited by John Aldrich on 26 November 2004

    • #296229
      racefanone
      Participant

      Thanks AK Plumber.Hang around this site and you will see some foolish replies.Most of my replies get deleted cause I dont agree with some of the answers from others.Been plumbing for about 40 years and still open to new ways to do things,but some of the replies are down right stupid.I am sure this reply will get deleted or edited also.Yours might also.

    • #296230
      AKPlumber
      Participant

      lol well hi and thanks for the welcome Race. I guess my reply was a bit overly harsh but bad advice is bad advice and should be tagged as such. If the moderators of these forums decide to leave bad advice up and edit replies that say as such, they are doing thier users a disservice. I hope that’s not the case, this is a fantastic site.
      By the way, if any of these guys ever apprenticed like I did under some of the more “down to earth” journeymen old timers out there, they should be well used to a little off color language.
      Thanks for your response, and hope your having a GR8 turkey day!

      » This message has been edited by AKPlumber on 25 November 2004

    • #296231
      Retired plbg1
      Participant

      Some water don’t agree with copper, you should cut it out and replace with copper or PVC for hot wter, can’t think what they call it now, check at hardware store or where you buy it.



      Art retired plbg

      » This message has been edited by John Aldrich on 26 November 2004

    • #296232
      AKPlumber
      Participant

      I think what you’re referring to maybe is Pex? Or Hepex for Hydronic applications, Aquapex for domestic.
      Pex is the way to go if your home or building is experiencing major pinhole leaks or otherwise corrosion. It’s guaranteed to last 50 years (if installed by a licensed cont.) excluding I would guess the brass/copper manifolds and fittings. But if electrolosis is the problem, and it’s otherwise incurable, I would consider replacing everything you can with Pex.

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