Submersible Well Pumps

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  • This topic has 6 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 18 years ago by Aquaman.
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    • #277025
      Mark Lyle

      I need to replace my well (4″) pump, and would appreciate a recommendation on what type (brand) of pump is the best to use. Would rather not do this again any time soon.

      Thanks!



      JW_77566

    • #295257
      GarySlusser
      Participant

      That’s like asking what is the best 1/2 ton pickup truck. Personally I sell Goulds and have Starite available. Starite is probably neck’n neck with Goulds as to quality although they cost me less. I also have a private barnd that is very good and priced less than the other two. All have 5 yr warranties. If you want a price, my email works. In your area you may find another brand is used over those used in my area.

      Anyway, are you sure you can lift your pump and drop pipe? If not, and if you haven’t done this job before… it can get a bit hairy and very expensive if you happen to drop things down the well or break something.

      Gary
      Quality Water Associates

    • #295258
      JW_77566
      Participant

      Gary –

      Thanks a bunch for your quick response. Goulds & Starite are what I’ve been told by the local folks are the best. One says that he uses the Goulds LS, not the GS, but when I looked up info on that it indicated that the LS was for 6″ & larger wells, not the 4″ I have. Two different folks have indicated to me that I’m looking at ~ $1000 for a new pump, but it appears that I can find either a Goulds GS or a Starite pump for ~ 500-$700 on the Internet – not sure… One fellow tells me that selecting the pump prior to extracting the drop pipe could lead to a mis-application. I know you need to run the pump on the curve, but it seems like most pumps should be OK – mine is at a depth of ~120 ft, and my tank runs from 40-60 psig. Also, I’m getting different opinions on what to replace the drop pipe with. One says sch 80 PVC w/ brass fittings, and the other says galvanized pipe. The galvanized guy says that the pump starting torque can put stress on the PVC threaded joint, but I have a hard time seeing this being an issue, whereas galvanic corrosion can be a problem – I think that’s probably why I’m having the problem I’m having (pump runs too long & won’t put up head). I’ve read some posts here, and no, I’m not going to attempt to do the job myself – seems like biting off a little too much, but I want to be sure that a) I’m getting a good deal, and b) I’m only going to have to do this once.

      Appreciate your thoughts,

      Jeff in Lake Jackson, TX



      JW_77566

    • #295259
      GarySlusser
      Participant

      IMO galvanized should be banned, and it will be within say ten to fifteen years due it causing water quality problems. Here in Central PA it’s difficult to find any used as drop pipe now and even 3/4″ fittings are hard to come by.

      Schedule 80 PVC is a good choice but it can be hard to work with being it comes in 20-21′ lengths. Polyethylene (PE) tubing and insert (barbed) fittings is best. It commonally comes in rolls from 100′ to 500′. We use it to 450′ and sch 80 over that. It comes in variuos ratings; 100, 125, 160 and 200 psi. For any sub pump, I only use 160 or 200 psi rated. For your 120′ well the 160 would be more than enough.

      If you don’t have galvanized now and get a 1″ male fitting on a 3/4″ or a threaded 1″ black iron or galvanized pipe long enough to screw into your pitless adapter and add a tee handle, you wouldn’t have much trouble pulling your pump (120′) as long as you had a helper and instructions. If you buy from me you get the instructions and toll free phone support.

      I sell the Goulds GS series. You should replace with the same hp and gpm that you have now. If you don’t know or can’t find out what it is, I’d suggest a 1/2hp 10 gpm. Depending on the cable you have, you’d then go with either a 2 or 3 wire version. A 3/4hp might be needed depending on your water usage and the static and pumping water levels and whether you have a cased and screened or rock bore well.

      Gary
      Quality Water Associates

    • #295260
      JW_77566
      Participant

      Thanks Gary –

      Still weighing my options, but I’ll be sure to not use galvanized pipe on the replacement. I’m not going to tackle the job myself – I’ve found that it’s earier to tear something apart than it is to put it back together. Anyhow, the well is inside a guest bedroom in my garage, and is not very accessible, so it will take a truck-mounted crane to get the pipe & pump out. Long story…

      Thanks again for the recommendations,

      Jeff

    • #295261
      GarySlusser
      Participant

      I don’t know, I have a machine that will pull galvanized to about 500′ and it sits on top of the casing. But you will have a difficulty getting long lengths of pipe up through the roof…. or cutting them off to be able to not go through it.

      So ask around for a pump puller machine.

      Gary
      Quality Water Associates

    • #295262
      Aquaman
      Participant

      Flotech is made by Sta-Rite, It can be purchased at most farm stores or Menard type lumber yards. Most of the submersible pumps will last 10 years or more. If you are having a problem with the pump clogging up with something it will not matter much how good a pump you have it will clog up also.

      A 120′ well is not that hard to pull. two men can do it easily with pipe wrenches. Use Sch 80 PVC with Sch 80 threaded couplings. Very easy to install back down the well, one pipe at a time 20′. Thousands installed across the USA. 1/2 hp 10 or 15 gpm pump.

      Dan



      Aquaman
      Water Treatment Specialist

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