Takeoffs and Makeups.

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  • This topic has 1 reply, 2 voices, and was last updated 20 years ago by SylvanLMP.
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    • #275244
      Rodney James Walton

      I just recently entered the plumbers union and it seems like every journeymen and foreman has a different way of measuring takeoffs and makeups for plastic, copper and gas pipe. If anybody could tell me the makeups and takeoffs for each i would greatly appreciate it. Also if you have any other measuring tips i would greatly appreciate it. Thank you

    • #291532
      SylvanLMP
      Participant

      quote:


      Originally posted by Ballman:
      I just recently entered the plumbers union and it seems like every journeymen and foreman has a different way of measuring takeoffs and makeups for plastic, copper and gas pipe. If anybody could tell me the makeups and takeoffs for each i would greatly appreciate it. Also if you have any other measuring tips i would greatly appreciate it. Thank you


      Wow your taking me way back in time.

      OK the show off mechanics used to give center to center measurements while the guys who really wanted more accuracy knew the “take offs” and gave end to end measurements rather then take a chance of the inexperienced making a bad cut.

      Some journeymen find it funny to bust an apprentices chops with Center to heel or crotch of ell or back of ell measurements.

      The worst is having to master either rolling offsets (3rd year stuff) or other angles like a 45 degree travel piece with the 1.4142 and then deduct the C-C measurements.

      Rule of thumb was a 1/2 brass or black malleable elbow or tee was a 1/2″ take off for the center to center measurement

      A 1/2 45 degree was 3/8th of an inch.

      A 2″ tee or Ell fitting was 2″ take off etc.

      What I did as a 1st year apprentice was measure the most common fittings 90 degree or 45’s and get the center to center or center to back or center to crotch of the fittings.

      The regular schedule 40 pipe fittings are no big deal but copper can be a problem as you have long radius and close ruff and drainage fittings (DWV) each with a different face to face measurement.

      You can contact several manufacturers and ask for a fitting book and look at each fitting for the various measurements like make up thread depth.

      By the way if your apprentice is part of the FANTASTIC UA training don’t worry as your going to learn some fantastic stuff over the next 5 years.

      Somethings your never going to forget like 3.14159265

      1.4142 2.31 8.33 . 434 and finding horse power and pump efficentcy melting temperatures of mild steel and carbon steel and copper and brazing alloys.

      DO NOT worry about the c to c measurements as this will come with just doing it and practicing in your shop training classes.

      The funny thing is when you thread 2″ pipe by hand (Union rules at one time) you learn to measure THREE TIMES and cut once.

      I did find one short cut in C-C measurements and that is find a flat surface like a wall and put the fitting squairly up against it THEN measure the fitting and take off for the thread so your cut isnt too long.

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