5″ Toilet Flange

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    • #275153

      I recently removed our old toilet and would like to install a new toilet, but the flange is 5″ in diameter. What are my options? Are there any adapters for the flange that will convert it to 4″?
      Any advice would be appreciated…
      [Edited by jak372 on 08 August 2001]

    • #291233

      If you mean the opening in the flange is 5″ then it is a 4″ flange and the extra size is for the lead and oakum joint assuming it is a cast-iron flange. Otherwise flanges only come in 4″ and 3″ sizes. A true 5″ flange would be too large to fit under the toilet.

    • #291234

      quote:


      Originally posted by fourth year:
      If you mean the opening in the flange is 5″ then it is a 4″ flange and the extra size is for the lead and oakum joint assuming it is a cast-iron flange. Otherwise flanges only come in 4″ and 3″ sizes. A true 5″ flange would be too large to fit under the toilet.


      The house was built prior to 1970 in which case the flange could be 5″ and still fit under the toilet. I measured the inside diameter of the flange and it measures 5″. Can some one please provide me with assistance?

    • #291235

      Jak, when installing new roof drains I do encounter 5″ an even 6″ lead piping.

      You have some options.

      1- Remove the lead pipe up to the existing brass ferrule and wipe the ferrule clean of all solder using a torch being very careful then install a No hub reducing coupling to ANY SIZE you little heart desires including 3″ for a toilet waste

      2- Take up the old floor flange and get 3″ or 4″ lead “D” pipe and insert it into the existing lead pipe and make a “Cup Joint” using Warranted Flemco # 1 Solder then solder on the new brass floor flange either in 3″ or 4″

      3- Get to the cast Iron and cut it just below the hub and either use No hub cast Iron with a Quick set cast Iron floor flange Or

      4- Use a Cast Iron caulked floor flange like I do on 4″ galvanized drainage piping when flange replacement becomes necessary.

      If you have any questions please feel free to E mail me.. Sylvan REAL LMP not in name only

    • #291236

      Whats his name strikes again ,huh Sylvan? Wrong again.

    • #291237

      quote:


      Originally posted by Sylvan:
      Jak, when installing new roof drains I do encounter 5″ an even 6″ lead piping.

      You have some options.

      1- Remove the lead pipe up to the existing brass ferrule and wipe the ferrule clean of all solder using a torch being very careful then install a No hub reducing coupling to ANY SIZE you little heart desires including 3″ for a toilet waste

      2- Take up the old floor flange and get 3″ or 4″ lead “D” pipe and insert it into the existing lead pipe and make a “Cup Joint” using Warranted Flemco # 1 Solder then solder on the new brass floor flange either in 3″ or 4″

      3- Get to the cast Iron and cut it just below the hub and either use No hub cast Iron with a Quick set cast Iron floor flange Or

      4- Use a Cast Iron caulked floor flange like I do on 4″ galvanized drainage piping when flange replacement becomes necessary.

      If you have any questions please feel free to E mail me.. Sylvan REAL LMP not in name only


      Thank you Sylvan for the useful information. I’ll let you know how it goes.

    • #291238

      Josh,Idid not say Sylvan was wrong.The other reply you got was .SYLVAN KNOWS WHAT I mean. Just ask him

    • #291239

      Unless you have your toilet sitting on one of the downspouts Sylvan mentioned, (which can also be 8″ or even 10″ depending on the installation, but irrelevent for your question), then you do not have 5″ or 6″ pipe. The hole in the flange is 5″ because it fits over a 4″ pipe which measures between 4 3/8 and 4 1/2″ outside diameter. It does not matter when the house was built, toilets have always been made to fit over a standard flange which would not be 5″. My original answer still holds. You have a 4″ flange designed to be lead/oakum sealed to a cast iron riser. If you have other than 4″ cast iron in the floor then you need a different type of flange.

    • #291240

      fourth year is correct here as much as it gauls me to admit it,you have to give credit where credit is due. one exception though a riser is a water line.

    • #291241

      Does that mean I cannot install “riser” clamps on drain, vent, or downspout pipes. And does that make those lines, “downers” or “droppers”?

    • #291242

      certainly not, riser clamps work well on stacks also. it dosen’t matter if thier waste, soil or vent either.

      kenny b

    • #291243

      quote:


      Originally posted by kenny b:
      certainly not, riser clamps work well on stacks also. it dosen’t matter if thier waste, soil or vent either.

      kenny b


      Kenny this is why we sometimes call them “pipe rests” so as not to confuse the helpers.

      Could you imagine how confused they would be is we said clevis hangers?
      I could picture the helpers looking for clevis piping LOL

    • #291244

      I’m glad that I never apprenticed under someone that thinks a riser pertains to water lines only.I try to stay clear of people with narrow minded views.

    • #291245

      Stick around here for a little while and you will find a whole raft of small minds. If you had “clevis pipe” then you would need clevis clamps. Perhaps when you were in the navy you saw some “U” shaped devices with a bolt through them and wondered what they were. Now you know that they were clevises. You are getting smarter by the day.

    • #291246

      Wallfraud you still dabbling in the trade?

      You put heating? What licenses do you hold in heating plant operations or boiler inspection or welding of heating piping do you hold a valid “R” stamp for your heating?

      A Riser can also be used for gas piping Or water lines, normally drainage lines are called for the type of drainage passing through them like.

      Storm LEADER or waste and Vent STACKS or soil lines or soil stack.

      Now in my case I also hold a Masters License in Fire suppression piping so we call a fire line a STAND PIPE. Or sprinkler risers BUT then again these lines do convey WATER.

      You know there is a section in the code books called “definitions”

      It is a marvelous thing to read and understand the terminology we plumbers and trades men use so as not to get confused.

      There are some really good trade schools you may consider attending so you not only have the basics down but now with a good formal education in plumbing you can know the reasoning also.

      The NAPHCC has some courses you should take to fully appreciate these fields.

      Speaking of hangers what is the name of the type of LEGAL hanger that is used on horiziontal sprinkler piping and why is it different from high pressure steam applications?

      Ok “heating” guy please explain.

    • #291247

      “1- Remove the lead pipe up to the existing brass ferrule and wipe the ferrule clean of all solder using a torch being very
      careful then install a No hub reducing coupling to ANY SIZE you little heart desires including 3″ for a toilet waste”

      Dont try this in Australia as its illegal to reduce the waste size from the WC

    • #291248

      quote:


      Originally posted by bungie1:
      “1- Remove the lead pipe up to the existing brass ferrule and wipe the ferrule clean of all solder using a torch being very
      careful then install a No hub reducing coupling to ANY SIZE you little heart desires including 3″ for a toilet waste”

      Dont try this in Australia as its illegal to reduce the waste size from the WC


      Bungie, this person said they have a 5″ diameter waste pipe correct?

      Now lets say they are correct in saying 5″ as we are not there.

      What code in ANY Country says you cannot INCREASE a waste line?

      As far as I knew plumbers sized drainage, water and vent by fixture units and developed length.

      Here I explained that a toilet can LEGALLY discharge into a 3″ soil line and having a reducer on a 5″ or even a 4″ line is LEGAL as your going from the toilet to the LARGER sized piping not decreasing the waste BUT increasing it at the cast Iron connection.

      Now Bungie lets consider this fact also.

      A lot of the newer toilets have a 1.6 GPF maximum and the existing drainage systems were sized on a 3.5 or MORE GPF so in reality by making the toilet connection either 3″ or 4″ your actually better off as your now getting a proper scouring action correct?

      Most civilized countries will allow for the INCREASE in a waste line like I suggested here.

      Even if It was a 4″ lead pipe, by using a 4″ no hub coupling they would not be decreasing the piping diameter at all BUT would make for a legal and easy connection for a new cast iron pipe to be used in lieu of a lead pipe.

      Remember in this country the DRAINAGE system STARTS at the FIXTURE not at the lead connection below the floor flange.

      A good rule of thumb would be the water supply ends at the fixture and the drainage starts there EASY to remember huh?

      PICTURE WORDS. So how are things at Oz? Send Michael the gasman my very best.

      Remember we only can take this gentleman’s word it that it is really a 5 “opening which is not really unreasonable knowing what is here in this country calling themselves techs or how little education is really required in some localities for getting a license.

    • #291249

      ” reducing coupling to ANY SIZE you little heart
      desires including 3″ for a toilet waste” <--- it was only this bit I was warning AU folks about. The waste from a WC here is 100mm. Have to remember this is international

      Haven’t spoke to michael for a while

    • #291250

      IF you took the time to read the original post, it is in English after all, you would see that they did not say they had a 5″ waste line, they had a 5″ flange which is unreasonable since it would not fit into the toilet recess, and since the hole measures 5″ it is a 4″ caulk on collar. All the rest of your talk about downspouts, 5 & 6″ pipes, lead bends (which will not work with no-hub bands unless they have the ferrule attached), fire hangers which have to secure the pipe, high pressure steam which should have roller hangers, etc., etc., is just a lot of B.S., since you could not dazzle people with your brilliance, and could not bring yourself to admit that you were wrong about the original question. But that is not all that unusual is it after reading many of your replies.

    • #291251

      quote:


      Originally posted by bungie1:
      ” reducing coupling to ANY SIZE you little heart
      desires including 3″ for a toilet waste” <--- it was only this bit I was warning AU folks about. The waste from a WC here is 100mm. Have to remember this is international

      Haven’t spoke to michael for a while


      PLEASE when you do send him my very best and ask him to please post something on my list as we miss his Aussie humor.

      He is one of the best when it comes to gas trouble shooting.

      I still have a printed copy of your work of art plumbing job you designed.

      Loz should post it and ask the so called plumbers to name the parts LOL

    • #291252
      Quote:
      Originally posted by fourth year:
      IF you took the time to read the original post, it is in English after all, you would see that they did not say they had a 5″ waste line, they had a 5″ flange which is unreasonable

      Oh “unreasonable LIKE a 160 PSI rated H/W heater huh?

      since it would not fit into the toilet recess, and since the hole measures 5″ it is a 4″ caulk on collar. All the rest of your talk about downspouts, 5 & 6″ pipes, lead bends (which will not work with no-hub bands unless they have the ferrule attached)

      Tell me 4th year of ONE lead pipe attached to a cast Iton system without a brass ferrule PLEASE just one

      , fire hangers which have to secure the pipe, high pressure steam which should have roller hangers, etc., etc.,

      WRONG guy rollers can cause the high pressure steam lines to move too much and thus cause undue STRESS how about allowing for INSULATION GUY as a “Normal” Clevis hanger will not support the insulation without tearing it DO you know ANYTHING about these trades?

      TSK.TSK pressure vessel expert that you are

    • #291253

      You are the one that said a lead pipe can be connected to a cast-iron one using a no-hub coupling. As per your previous literal readings, you should have specified that it had to have a brass ferrule attached to it first. And the hangers require insulation saddles that support the pipe after the insulation is installed around them, or haven’t you ever seen anything like that?

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