COPPER TUBE INSTALLATION

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    • #273328
      MasterPlumbers
      Keymaster

      WE RECENTLY HAD ROUGH PLUMBING INSTALLED IN OUR NEW HOME THAT IS BEING BUILT. I HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT WE MADE A “BIG” MISTAGE GOING COPPER, I.E. HOLES DEVELOP, 90% OF REGISTRAR OF CONTRACTOR’S COMPLAINS ON COPPER PLUMBING AND LEAKS UNDER THE SLAP. THE PLUMBER USED POLY SLEEVE TO HELP RESIST CORROSION. IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE WE SHOULD DO TO PROTECT THE PIPE? ONCE INSPECTED AND WE BACK FILL, ARE THERE ANY TRICKS TO KEEP THE PIPE FROM BEING DAMAGED WHEN THEY PREPARE FOR THE SLAB?

    • #287376

      The plumbers that installed the copper tubing in the 200 homes in our development did a good job 25 years ago. They washed away all the solder flux from the joints as they did a good soldering job. They covered the tubing with 3/8-inch foam insulation to prevent contact with concrete and stones. The slabs were poured with care. The copper could move within the foam, so there was no stress failure.

      I do know of two homes where they slipped up and the concrete had to be removed and a leak fixed after 15 years. The precautions that apply to radiant heat plastic tubing also apply to copper.

    • #287377

      contrary to what you seem to be told, copper is the best you can have, I have to admit im interested to know the quality of the copper pipe in the states as you appear to have a LOT of failures, something I dont see here.

    • #287378

      Bungie, the reason we do have copper failures here is simple.

      We have MORONS who use compression connections on both side of the valve as they are too lazy/stupid to solder and do a proper installation.

      We also have “plumbers” who would never get caught reaming the copper tubing after cutting it prior to soldering.

      We also have so called mechanics who also use under sized tubing to save a few pennies during installation and have total disregard to velocity of the water flowing through this piping.

      Then of course we had the blokes who use self cleaning flux and never bother to actually remove the remaining acid so this system has to be prone to failures.

      Then there is the unknowing who use excessively hot water for heating applications with no knowledge how to size the tubing thus again causing turbulent flow and piping erosion.

      You also have to take into consideration the fact ANYONE can and do install under slab heating with no license required then BLAME the manufacturer.

      The Franchise “plumbers” have 12 weeks training instead of the recommended 5 years apprenticeship.

      With all these factors it amazes me we don’t have even more failures going on.

      The lack of licensing is going to completely destroy the credibility of highly skilled trades as now any stumble bum can go into heating.

      The same with water treatment and filtration as ANY unemployable is now an “expert” in this field.

      Anyone who couldnt find/keep a job is selling “filters” and filter systems OR chemicals for drain cleaning.

      Amazing the new generation of self proclaimed “experts” in some fields

      You have seen nothing yet as far as American piping failures are concerned.

      This is just the tip of the iceberg as more and more folks find easy money in under slab heating and do it yourself piping.

      It should be quite interesting watching the manufactures trying to make products as fool proof as possible to make up for the lack of training and skills now dabbling in heating and piping trades.

      Let the games continue as more stumble bums fight to do away with licensing laws.

      After all the non licensed guys need to feel good about themselves just like the American schools are no longer having a pass or fail grade EVERYONE gets a social promotion.

      Hey Bungie hiring anyone lately. LOL

    • #287379

      None of the above answers explain why you get runs of pin holes in the copper pipes, as many people report here. They may explain failures at the joints and fittings, but not pitting over the length of the pipe.

      My employes over the years have been respectful to my customers, a trait that you lack badly as seen in a large percentage of your posts here.

      Hey Sylvan, been courteous to anyone lately. LOL

    • #287380

      Experience has shown me that the biggest reason for copper pipe failure is acidic water. In some areas unless your well water is treated the copper piping simply won’t hold up.

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