Plumbing a laundry tray

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    • #284652
      Avatar photokeith melling

        I am a do-it-yourselfer and am currently constructing a laundry room to be located inside a large closet inside a half-bath,which I am also constructing at the same time.My Question is: How do you plumb a 1 drain line into the 2 washing machine drain line?My township inspectors are requesting that I install a laundry tray where the washing machine will be located. This laundry room is over an 8 foot crawspace annexed to the basement and as such all of my plumbing is exposed under the floor joists.The laundry tray I purchased comes with a knockout in which a 1 drain is to be installed to drain water way should the machine ever leak or overflow.I had thought the 1 drain would have to be trapped but then realized any water in the trap would dry up since the tray drain will never really be used.. So I figured I would run the 1 drain into the 2 laundry drain before the p-trap.But there is another problem. The wall the standpipe is located in used to be an exterior wall (this laundry room is now an enclosed porch converted to living space and a half bath). As such, immediately below is the stone foundation.So, in order to run the 1 drain into the 2, I have to extend the standpipe down through the wall interior close to the foundation, install a 90 long turn ell and run horizontal for about 1 foot, then install another 90 ell to go vertical again, install a 2 wye, and THEN the P-trap for the laundry drain, come out of the p-trap into a sanitary tee. The bottom of the tee would complete the run to the house drain, while the top of the tee I would install a 90 degree ell, run horizontal back into the wall, install another 90 ell to go back up through the interior of the wall and connect to the existing vent pipe. In the 2 wye I would install a 1 bushing to accept the 1 drain.This route puts my p-trap for the washer standpipe about 4 to 5 feet away from the top of the standpipe, and remember there are two turns along the way. Is this acceptable? It seems there has to be a better way.thank you. Rich

      • #302744
        Avatar photoRich
        Participant

          : I am a do-it-yourselfer and am currently constructing : a laundry room to be located inside a large closet : inside a half-bath,which I am also constructing at : the same time.: My Question is: How do you plumb a 1 drain line into : the 2 washing machine drain line?: My township inspectors are requesting that I install : a laundry tray where the washing machine will be : located. This laundry room is over an 8 foot crawspace : annexed to the basement and as such all of my plumbing : is exposed under the floor joists.: The laundry tray I purchased comes with a knockout : in which a 1 drain is to be installed to drain water way : should the machine ever leak or overflow.: I had thought the 1 drain would have to be trapped : but then realized any water in the trap would dry : up since the tray drain will never really be used.. : So I figured I would run the 1 drain into the 2 laundry : drain before the p-trap.: But there is another problem. The wall the standpipe : is located in used to be an exterior wall (this laundry : room is now an enclosed porch converted to living : space and a half bath). As such, immediately below : is the stone foundation.: So, in order to run the 1 drain into the 2, I have : to extend the standpipe down through the wall interior : close to the foundation, install a 90 long turn ell and run : horizontal for about 1 foot, then install another 90 ell to : go vertical again, install a 2 wye, and THEN the P-trap : for the laundry drain, come out of the p-trap into a sanitary : tee. The bottom of the tee would complete the run to the : house drain, while the top of the tee I would install a : 90 degree ell, run horizontal back into the wall, install : another 90 ell to go back up through the interior of the : wall and connect to the existing vent pipe. In the 2 wye : I would install a 1 bushing to accept the 1 drain.: This route puts my p-trap for the washer standpipe about 4 to 5 : feet away from the top of the standpipe, and remember there : are two turns along the way. Is this acceptable? It seems : there has to be a better way.: thank you. : RichRich, When draining the washer pan, do not connect to the waste and vent system except through a p-trap that will regularly get water for the trap seal. ( a trap primer would work)You may ask the inspector if the 1 drain for the pan has to connect to the waste and vent system. The T&Ps on water heaters dont.Q.What is a vent, and what does it do for the plumbing system?A. If you look on your roof, you will see pipes sticking out of the roof aprox 12 high. �For every pipe that goes down, one needs to go up. �The obvious reason we have vents is that sewer gases need to be vented outside of the dwelling. �Not so obvious is what happens if they are not included in the waste and vent design. �Imagine yourself at McDonalds drinking a soda from a straw. �If you put your thumb over the straw, you can pull liquid up from the cup. Remove the thumb and see it instantly drain out! �When liquid goes down a pipe, air needs to follow it. �Without the vent pipe, the draining liquid will try to suck air through the P-traps on the plumbing fixtures,(tub, sink, etc.) glurp, glurp! �If it manages to do so, you may know it from the smell coming from the now dry seal on the P-trap. Without vents, draining one fixture may cause another fixture in the house to back up, yuck! A waste and vent system should keep sewer gas out of the dwelling and drain every fixture well. � Regards, Terry Love

        • #303319
          Avatar photoRich
          Participant

            : Hi!Im sorry that I dont have the answer you are looking for, but wondered if you would tell me where I could purchase a laundry tray.Thanks,Gary Jensen: : I am a do-it-yourselfer and am currently constructing : : a laundry room to be located inside a large closet : : inside a half-bath,which I am also constructing at : : the same time.: : My Question is: How do you plumb a 1 drain line into : : the 2 washing machine drain line?: : My township inspectors are requesting that I install : : a laundry tray where the washing machine will be : : located. This laundry room is over an 8 foot crawspace : : annexed to the basement and as such all of my plumbing : : is exposed under the floor joists.: : The laundry tray I purchased comes with a knockout : : in which a 1 drain is to be installed to drain water way : : should the machine ever leak or overflow.: : I had thought the 1 drain would have to be trapped : : but then realized any water in the trap would dry : : up since the tray drain will never really be used.. : : So I figured I would run the 1 drain into the 2 laundry : : drain before the p-trap.: : But there is another problem. The wall the standpipe : : is located in used to be an exterior wall (this laundry : : room is now an enclosed porch converted to living : : space and a half bath). As such, immediately below : : is the stone foundation.: : So, in order to run the 1 drain into the 2, I have : : to extend the standpipe down through the wall interior : : close to the foundation, install a 90 long turn ell and run : : horizontal for about 1 foot, then install another 90 ell to : : go vertical again, install a 2 wye, and THEN the P-trap : : for the laundry drain, come out of the p-trap into a sanitary : : tee. The bottom of the tee would complete the run to the : : house drain, while the top of the tee I would install a : : 90 degree ell, run horizontal back into the wall, install : : another 90 ell to go back up through the interior of the : : wall and connect to the existing vent pipe. In the 2 wye : : I would install a 1 bushing to accept the 1 drain.: : This route puts my p-trap for the washer standpipe about 4 to 5 : : feet away from the top of the standpipe, and remember there : : are two turns along the way. Is this acceptable? It seems : : there has to be a better way.: : thank you. : : Rich: Rich, : When draining the washer pan, do not connect to the waste and vent system except through a p-trap that will regularly get water for the trap seal. ( a trap primer would work)You may ask the inspector if the 1 drain for the pan has to connect to the waste and vent system. The T&Ps on water heaters dont.: Q.What is a vent, and what does it do for the plumbing system?: A. If you look on your roof, you will see pipes sticking out of the roof aprox 12 high. �For every pipe that goes down, one needs to go up. �The obvious reason we have vents is that sewer gases need to be vented outside of the dwelling. �Not so obvious is what happens if they are not included in the waste and vent design. �Imagine yourself at McDonalds drinking a soda from a straw. �If you put your thumb over the straw, you can pull liquid up from the cup. Remove the thumb and see it instantly drain out! �When liquid goes down a pipe, air needs to follow it. �Without the vent pipe, the draining liquid will try to suck air through the P-traps on the plumbing fixtures,(tub, sink, etc.) glurp, glurp! �If it manages to do so, you may know it from the smell coming from the now dry seal on the P-trap. Without vents, draining one fixture may cause another fixture in the house to back up, yuck! A waste and vent system should keep sewer gas out of the dwelling and drain every fixture well. � : Regards, : Terry Love

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